AN AZTEC HERBAL THE CLASSIC CODEX OF 1552 PDF

By Dover Publications. A truly unique and informative read. The book was translated into English in by William Gates. In these pages are centuries-old Aztec remedies for boils, hair loss, cataracts, insomnia, sore throats, hiccups, gout, lesions, wounds, joint diseases, tumors, and scores of other ailments. Over black-and-white figures of the plants augment the text, along with 38 full color illustrations made specially for the Gates edition. Additional supplements include an introduction to the Mexican botanical system, an analytical index of the plants, and a new Introduction by anthropologist Bruce Byland of the City University of New York.

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By Dover Publications. A truly unique and informative read. The book was translated into English in by William Gates. In these pages are centuries-old Aztec remedies for boils, hair loss, cataracts, insomnia, sore throats, hiccups, gout, lesions, wounds, joint diseases, tumors, and scores of other ailments. Over black-and-white figures of the plants augment the text, along with 38 full color illustrations made specially for the Gates edition. Additional supplements include an introduction to the Mexican botanical system, an analytical index of the plants, and a new Introduction by anthropologist Bruce Byland of the City University of New York.

Remarkable for its scope, detail, careful observation, and accurate description, An Aztec Herbal stands as a magnificent example of the impressive medical knowledge of indigenous peoples. This handsome and inexpensive edition of a long-unavailable work promises to engender a new appreciation of the skill and inventiveness of Aztec medical practices in particular and of Native American science in general.

This Dover edition, first published in , is an unabridged republication of the work first published by The Maya Society, Baltimore, Maryland, in The illustrations reproduced in color in the edition are reprinted in black and white in the Dover edition. The Introduction was written by Bruce Byland for the Dover edition.

Materia medica—Early works to Materia medica, Vegetable—Mexico. Medicinal plants—Mexico. Gates, William, — CHAPTER FIFTH: tooth-polish, curation of swelling and festering gums, aching and decaying teeth with much heat, tumors and suppuration of the throat, angina, medicine to ease pain in the gullet, to bring back saliva when dry, when the saliva comes bloody, to allay a cough, to stop foul and offensive breath.

CHAPTER SIXTH: for cooling the heat of a swollen jaw, to cure one who cannot yawn for the pain, for scabs on the face or mouth, for scrofulous eruptions on the neck, dropsy, lameness or weakness of the hands. CHAPTER SEVENTH: on chest trouble, pain in the heart and heat, pain in the sides, medicine to kill worms and animalcula, antidote for poison, tumor of the stomach, pains in the abdomen, dysentery or griping, rumbling of the abdomen, chill, purging.

CHAPTER EIGHTH: Curation of the pubis and groin, stoppage of the urine, difficulty in passing, affections of the rectum, gout, pain in the knees, the knees beginning to contract, remedy for cracks coming in the soles of the feet, lesions in the feet, against fatigue, trees and flowers to relieve lassitude in the administrators of the affairs of the state and the public business.

CHAPTER NINTH: the remedy for black blood, fevers, haemorrhoids, rectal swellings, excessive heat, cuts on the body, ringworm and tetter, recurrent attacks of disease, skin eruptions, wounds, disease of the joints, itch, festering with worms, inflammations, difficult digestion, swelling in cut veins after phlebotomy, those struck by lightning. CHAPTER TENTH: on the falling sickness, or epilepsy, the remedy for fear or timidity, a mind unbalanced by a tornado or bad wind, warts, hircine armpit odor of sick people, phthirasis of lousy distemper, lice on the head, for a traveler crossing a river or water.

He offered to return to Mexico the original manuscript of the Libellus de Medicinalibus Indorum Herbis, the first herbal and the first medical text known to have been written in the New World. This amazing and beautiful book had been written in Nahuatl, the Aztec language, at the College of Santa Cruz, in Tlatelolco, in the year-old colony called New Spain now Mexico , by Martin de la Cruz, an Aztec physician. It was that version that had been sent to Spain in There followed several years of incompletely documented meanderings before it became part of the library of Cardinal Francesco Barberini, the nephew of Pope Urban VII, early in the 17th century.

In the Barberini library became part of the Vatican Library and there the little book sat until After an absence of years, this remarkable book came home. The Libellus has been known by several other names through the years. It is best known as the Badianus Manuscript, after its translator, or as the Codex Barberini, Latin , as it was catalogued by the Italian Cardinal who owned it in the 17th century.

It also has been called the Codex de la Cruz—Badiano, after both its author and its translator. It is now most often known by its own original title, Libellus de Medicinalibus Indorum Herbis. It is in this way that this wonderful book is now catalogued in the library of the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History in Mexico City. The Libellus was written in in Tlatelolco at the behest of the friar Jacobo de Grado, who was in charge of the Convent of Tlatelolco and the College of Santa Cruz.

De Grado had it written and translated into Latin for don Francisco de Mendoza, an advocate of the college and the son of the Viceroy of New Spain, don Antonio de Mendoza. Mendoza promptly sent it to Spain, presumably to the Hapsburg king, Carlos V, as evidence of the intellectual acumen of the Mexicans and in an appeal for support for the college. Felipe relegated the manuscript to the royal library, where it was left virtually untouched. It contained much information about native curing practices, but it was not widely disseminated in Europe, perhaps because many of its ingredients were named only in Nahuatl, and were neither identifiable nor available in Europe.

The manuscript was virtually unknown in Mexico, also, perhaps because it was sent to Spain so soon after it was written. It was not cited in any medical or botanical writing from either side of the Atlantic for the entire period from the 16th through the 19th century That is not to say that its subject was not recognized.

It was clearly appreciated as a beautiful and exotic work of art about medicine. We know that it came into the collection of Diego de Cortavila y Sanabria, the pharmacist to Felipe IV, king of Spain in the early 17th century. How it came to be in his possession is not known. From Cortavila it moved to Cardinal Francesco Barberini, perhaps directly or perhaps through one or more private collections, a transition that may have occurred when Barberini was in Spain during and Vicario The dal Pozzo copy wound up in the collection of George III of England late in the 18th century and it, in turn, languished largely unnoticed in the library of Windsor Castle.

So things sat until , when the Libellus was rediscovered. In that year Charles Upson Clark happened upon it in the Vatican library during a search for material related to the early civilizations of the Americas.

In that same year Lynn Thorndike was reviewing the Barberini collection for documents related to the history of science and medicine. He noted the existence of the manuscript in his catalogue of Vatican manuscripts on the subject. Finally, also in , Giuseppe Gabrieli published a brief note about the dal Pozzo copy that he had found some years before among the holdings of Windsor Castle. William Gates seems to have learned of the manuscript from these first rediscoverers.

He revived the moribund Maya Society in for the purpose of publishing his own writings when he became a research associate at Johns Hopkins University, and by the publication of the Aztec Herbal was planned. He worked toward publication of the Libellus sporadically for the next seven years, completing various other projects in the meantime.

Finally, in , he published two volumes, one with the text in Latin and one with an English translation. A simultaneous effort to produce an edition of the Herbal was being mounted by Emily Walcott Emmart, who also was associated with Johns Hopkins.

Emmart learned of the manuscript in and, at the urging of many, set out to publish the Badianus Manuscript with a facsimile, transcription, translation, and commentary Emmart ix.

She, too, sought the aid of Cardinal Tisserant and his niece, who did the fine watercolors that Emmart ultimately published. A more accomplished scholar and a better fund-raiser, she was. Upload Sign In Join. Home Books Science. Create a List. Download to App. Length: pages 2 hours. Description "I love that this book is the real deal. Myths of the Cherokee Author James Mooney. Book Preview An Aztec Herbal. Bibliographical Note This Dover edition, first published in , is an unabridged republication of the work first published by The Maya Society, Baltimore, Maryland, in Includes bibliographical references and index.

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An Aztec Herbal: The Classic Codex of 1552

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A truly unique and informative read. The book was translated into English in by William Gates. In these pages are centuries-old Aztec remedies for boils, hair loss, cataracts, insomnia, sore throats, hiccups, gout, lesions, wounds, joint diseases, tumors, and scores of other ailments. Over black-and-white figures of the plants augment the text, along with 38 full color illustrations made specially for the Gates edition. Additional supplements include an introduction to the Mexican botanical system, an analytical index of the plants, and a new Introduction by anthropologist Bruce Byland of the City University of New York.

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